UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE RESOURCES
including
Ukrainian - English online wordlist
basic Ukrainian grammar and other Ukrainian online dictionaries


UKRAYINS'KA MOVA
Ukrainische Sprache, Ukrainsk Språk, Lingua Ucraina, Langue Ukrainien,
Safa Ukrainit, Oukrainiki, Ukrainan kieli, Lingua Ukraina, Jezyk Ukrainski,
Ukrainskiy yazyk, Ukrán nyelv, Langua Ukraina, Idioma Ukraina,
Idioma Ucraniana

Ukrainian (formerly known as Ruthenian) language is my native. Below I am presenting a few Ukrainain online dictionaries (wordlists) with some basic Ukrainian vocabulary in English transliteration on the front page.

Ukrainian, like some other Slavic languages as Russian, Belorussian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Serbian
and non Slavic as Kazakh, Kyrghyz, Uzbek, Tajik, Azeri, Yakut, Chukchi, Karelian and many other
peoples of former Russian empire uses the Cyrillic alphabeth and is written in Cyrillic letters. The closest languages it is similiar are: Belorussian, Russian, Polish, Slovak and Old Church Slavonic as well as to other Slavic languages such as Czech, Bulgarian, Serbo-Croation, Macedonian and Slovenian.

It belongs to Eastern group of Slavic (Slavonic) languages and is the most ancient live Slavic language, being the most closely related language to Old Slavonic, the common language of ancestors of modern Slavs as well as like Sanskrit it is one of the closest languages to the common language of the first Indo-Europeans (Aryans). Ukrainian has many words which are almost identical as in Sanskrit, for instance Ukrainian "povi'trya" (air) or "vohon'" (fire). It is the language which was spoken in medieval Kievan Rus' kingdom (10 th - 13 th centuries). Russian is newer language and derives from Ukrainian church language (called Church Slavonic). Many of Ukrainian words you
will not find in any other Slavic languge and others such as "kavun'" (water melon) or "maydan'" (square) derive from Tatar and Turkish for instance, because of historical influences.

Ukrainian is spoken mainly in Western part of Ukraine (where it undergone some Polish influence) and in rural areas of Eastern Ukraine. Eastern Ukrainian cities are russified and mainly Russian speaking (for instance although Ukrainians make up a quarter of the Crimean population, only four of 582 Crimean schools (0.69 percent) are Ukrainian, and only one out of 392
publications on the peninsula is in Ukrainian. In the Donbas, where Ukrainians constitute 50 percent of the population, the proportion of pupils in Ukrainian language schools is still only 10 percent) because of shauvinist and imperialist language politics of imperial Russia, where Ukrainian was considered as Little Russian language and was prohibited to use as famous Tsar's official Valuev said "Ukrainian language did not exist, it does not exist and it will not exist" Ukrainian is very well preserved in Western Ukraine (where I come from) which had never been part of Russia but of Austria and Poland and thus avoided russification.

During Soviet times it undergone further russification. Persons who tried to protect the rights
to speak in Ukrainian were deported to Siberia. Those who spoke Ukrainian instead of Russian were called and treated as "bourgois nationalists". Thus, Eastern Ukraine urban areas are completely russified: in Ukraine, where Russians are the largest minority, constituting 22 percent of the population, 33 percent of pupils and students are enrolled in Russian- language schools and universities (mostly in Eastern and Southern Ukraine, since instruction in Western Ukrainian Schools is exclusively in Ukrainian). In Ukraine, 1,193 newspapers are published in Russian
(largely in Eastern and Southern Ukraine), compared with 1,394 in Ukrainian (mostly in Western area of Ukraine).

Despite the sad past, nowadays, Ukrainian language is going through a revival and it has become the language of TV films, science, newspapers, computers and Internet, being the only official language of 49 millions people Ukraine.

MY UKRAINIAN ONLINE DICTIONARIES - WORDLISTS:
For convienience reasons, in all wordlists I am using Latin transliteration for Ukrainian

UKRAINIAN - ENGLISH

ITALIAN - UKRAINIAN

ITALIANO - UCRAINO

NORWEGIAN - UKRAINIAN

NORSK - UKRAINSK

POLISH - UKRAINIAN

POLSKO - UKRAINSKI

POLISH - UKRAINIAN - ENGLISH

POLSKO - UKRAINSKI - ANGIELSKI

SWEDISH - UKRAINIAN - ENGLISH

SVENSK - UKRAINSK -
ANGELSK

SWEDISH - UKRAINIAN

SVENSK - UKRAINSK


LINKS RESOURCES ON UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE:

Resources in English:
My English Ukrainian Wordlist Online (contains about 600 terms)
Language situation in Ukraine
Ukrainian linguistic resources
Ukrainian for Beginners Online Course
English- Ukrainian online dictionary
Ukrainian - English online dictionary
Notes on Ukrainian Language (The Ukrainian Alphabet, basic sentences,
20 phrases in Ukrainian in sound, 2 Ukrainian songs)
Published Ukrainian dictionaries
Ukrainian Language: Encyclopaedia Britannica
Ukrainian language from Linda Hodges' page
Ukrainian language for tourists
Ukrainian Tutorial CD Rom
Ukrainian Language Books from Amazon.com
Ukrainian: A Comprehensive Grammar is the only complete reference guide to modern Ukrainian grammar currently available
Ukrainian : A Complete Course for Beginners by Olena Bekh, James Dingley, Jame Dingley
The first on-line dictionary of modern Ukrainian language from the Academy of Science of Ukraine (the dictionary is in Ukrainian and so far there is only "P" letter database).
Ukrainian Language Software
Ukrainian Language Links
Resources in French:
Russie / Ukraine: la controverse impossible du discours identitaire
Langue Ukrainien
Phonologie de l'ukrainien
Communiquer avec les Ukrainiens
Alphabet et Ecriture Ukrainien
Resources in German:
Die Ukraine im Spannungsfeld der Kulturen
Resources in Italian:
My Italian - Ukrainian Online Dictionary (over 1.000 terms).
Il mio dizionario Italiano Ucrain.
Associazione Italiana degli Slavisti
Mappa della Slavistica Italia
Resources in Norwegian and Swedish:
Norwegian - Ukrainian online dictionary (About 1.050 terms) (mine).
Norsk - Ukrainsk ordbok online (mine).
Ukraine in Norway Homepage. Early history of Ukraine in Norwegian (mine).
Swedish - Ukrainian - English Wordlist, including short converstaion guide (mine).
Swedish - Ukrainian wordlist and conversation guide (mine).
Swedish - English Wordlist (mine)
Resources in Polish:
Polish - Ukrainian - English Wordlist / Slownik Polsko - Ukrainski Angielski (mine).
Polish - Ukrainian Wordlist / Slownik Polsko Ukrainski (mine).
Polish - English Wordlist / Slownik Polsko Angielski (mine).

UKRAINIAN VOCABULARY AND BASIC GRAMMAR:
(in English transliteration)


Some of basic nouns - Imen'nyky:
Accent is marked with underlined vowels or with vowels followed by inversted coma / apostrophe. In some cases inverted coma signifies soft sign (if it stands after a consonant).

mova - language
s
ontse - sun
trav
a - grass
vikn
o - window
m
aty, mama - mother, mom
b
at'ko, tato - father, dad
syn - son
simy
a - family
stil - table
dor
oha - road
v
ulytsia - street
kokh
annia - love
k
azka - fairy-tale
khlopets - boy
d
ivchyna - girl
muzhch
yna - man
zh
inka - woman, wife
shliakh - way
l
izhko - bed
stina - wall
noh
a - foot
ruk
a - hand
holov
a - head
z
irka - star
tilo - body
m
isto - town
kray
ina - country
derzh
ava - state
stol
ytsia - capital city
kimn
ata - room
vovk - wolf
n
ebo - sky
khm
ara - cloud
liud
yna - man (in sense of human)
kn
yzhka - book
kv
itka - flower
dim - house
kit - cat
pes / sob
aka - dog
hod
yna - hour
hod
ynnyk - watch, clock
chas - time
kart
oplia - potatoe
b
ulba - potatoe (in rural dialects all over Ukraine)
barab
olia - potatoe (Berezhany district dialect)
rik
a, richka - river
ozero - lake
m
ore - sea
p
otik / strumok - brook
lis - forest
hor
a - mountain
horb, p
ahorb - hill
hay - wood, little forest
d
erevo - tree
s
elo - village
p
ole, lan - field
s
ino - hay
ts
erkva - church
st
ezhka - path, pathway
zemly
a - land
voh
on' - fire
hrom
ada - community
hr
oshi - money
lit
ak - plane
mash
yna - car
p
otiah, poyizd - train
vedm
id' - bear
z
ayets, zaychyk- hare
vovk - wolf
b
ilka - squirell
ol
en - deer
oko - eye
v
ukho - ear
nis - nose
rot - mouth
lyts
e - face
m
orkva - carrot
tsyb
ulia - onion
y
abluko - apple
y
abko - apple (Western Ukrainian dialect)
vynohr
ad' - grape


Pronouns - Zaymen'nnyky:

Ya - I
Ty - You
Vin - He
Vona' - She
Vono', Tse - It
My - We
Vy - You (polite form)
Vony' - They


Conjugation of personal pronouns of 1 st, 2 nd, 3 person sing. and plural:

Nom.: Ya (I), ty (You), Vin (He), Vona (she), My (we), Vy (You, plural), vony (they)
Gen.: miy, tviy, yoho', yiyi', nash, Vash, yikh'niy
Dat.: meni, tobi, yomu', yiy, nam, Vam, yim
Acc.: mene, tebe, yoho', yiyi', nas, Vas, yikh


Possesive pronouns:

miy - my (masc.)
moya' - my (fem.)
moyi' - my (plural)
tviy, tvoya', tvoyi' - your
Vash, Va'sha, Va'shi - your (polite form)
yikh, yi'khnia, yi'khni - their
yiyi' - her
yoho' - his
nash, na'sha, nashi - our


Adjectives - Prykemt'nyky:
 
 Adjectives have masculine, feminine and middle forms:
 
 For example:
 
 bi'lyy - white (masc.)
 bi'la - white (fem.)
 bi'le - white (mid.) 
 
 zele'nyy - green (masc)
 zele'na - green (fem.)
 zele'ne - green (mid.) 
 
 novyy' - new (masc.)
 nova' - new (fem.)
 nove' - new (mid.)

Other adjectives are conjugated the same way as above:
 
 chor'nyy - black
 sy'niy - blue
 chervo'nyy - red
 kory'chnevyy - brown
 shvydkyy' - fast
 povil'nyy - slow
 cika'vyy - interesting
 dale'kyy - far
 blyzkyy' - near, close
 har'nyy - nice
 poha'nyy - bad
 smachnyy' - tasty
 dobryy' - good
 strashnyy' - horrible, frightful
 svit'lyy - clear
 tem'nyy - dark
 vazhkyy' - heavy
 lehkyy' - easy
 bid'nyy - poor
 baha'tyy - rich
 kozh'nyy - every

Verbs - Diyeslova':
 
 yty - to go
 bih'ty - to run
 spiva'ty - to sing
 yis'ty - to eat
 pamyata'ty - to remember
 zabuva'ty - to forget
 dava'ty - to give
 bra'ty - to take
 pysa'ty - to write
 zhy'ty - to live
 lita'ty - to fly
 vi'ryty - to believe
 du'maty - to think
 dya'kuvaty - to thank
 Dia'kuyu! - (I) thank you!
 Dia'kuyemo!  - (We) thank you!
 hra'ty - to play
 hovory'ty - to speak
 skaza'ty - to say
 slu'khaty - to listen
 chu'ty - to hear
 krycha'ty - to shout
 pla'katy - to cry
 vchy'ty - to study
 spa'ty - to sleap
 mri'yaty - to dream
 shuka'ty - to seek
 znakho'dyty - to find
 cheka'ty - to wait
 liuby'ty - to like
 kokha'ty - to love
 ba'chyty - to see
 dyvy'tysya - to look, to watch 
 vybacha'ty  - to excuse
 perepro'shuvaty - to ask pardon
 Vy'bachte! - Excuse me!
 Perepro'shuyu, pro'shu! - pardon!
 zna'ty - to know

CONJUGATION OF TO "ZNA'TY"  (TO KNOW) IN PRESENT INDEFINITE TIME:
 
 Ya znayu  - I know
 Ty zna'yesh - You (singular form) know
 Vin, Vona, Vono zna'ye - He, She, It knows
 My zna'yemo - We  know
 Vy zna'yete - You (polite and plural form) know
 Vony' zna'yut - They know 
 
 The same way most of other verbs are conjugated

Modal Verbs - Modal'ni diyeslova:
 
 ma'ty - have, to own
 mohty' - can, to be able
 
 Ya ma'yu/mo'zhu - I have/can
 Ty ma'yesh/mo'zhesh - You have/can
 Vin, Vona, Vono ma'ye/mo'zhe - He, She, It has/can
 My ma'yemo/mo'zhemo - We have/can
 Vy ma'yete/mo'zhete - You (as polite form) have/can
 Vony ma'yut/ mo'zhut - They have/can

"BU'TY" - TO BE:
 
 Ya ye - I am
 Ty ye - You (singular form) are
 Vin, Vona', Vono'/Tse ye - He, She, It is
 My, Vony' ye - We, they are
 Vy ye - You (plural & polite form) are

FUTURE FORMS OF "BU'TY" (TO BE)
 
 Ya budu - I will be
 Ty bu'desh - You will be 
 Vin, Vona', Vono'/Tse bu'de - He, She, It will be
 My bude'mo - We will be
 Vy bude'te - You (polite form) will be
 Vony bu'dut - They will be

Adverbs - Prysliv'nyky:
 
 shvyd'ko - quickly
 povil'no - slowly
 cika'vo - interestingly
 ma'lo - little
 baha'to - a lot, a number, many, much
 dale'ko - faraway
 blyz'ko - closely
 pravyl'no, vir'no - correctly, right
 de'koly, in'koly - sometimes
 des' - somewhere
 vnyz - down, downwards
 vnyzu' - down there
 vverkh - up, upwards
 naverkh', naverkhu', nahori' - up, on the top
 nicho'ho - nothing
 shchos' - something
 khtos' - someone
 nikto' - nobody
 ko'zhen - every, each
 Tre'ba - it is needed
 Neobkhid'no - it is necessary
 Bud' las'ka! - Please!

INTERROGATIVE PRONOUNS
 
 Khto? - Who?
 De? - Where?
 Yak? - How?
 Yakyy', Yaka', Yake'? - Which? (Masc., Fem., Mid.)
 Shcho? - What?
 Koly'? - When?
 Skil'ky? - How many/much?
 Chomu'? - Why?
 Choho'? Dliacho'ho? - Why for?

Prepositions - Pryymen'nyky:
 
 v, u - in, at
 na - on
 pid - under
 tam - there
 tut - here
 ot'zhe - therefore
 bi'lia, ko'lo - at, near
 shcho - that, which
 tsey, tsia - this (masc, fem.)
 tse - it 
 toy, ta, to - that (indicative forms in masc., fem., mid.)
 tak - yes

Conjuctions - Spolu'chnyky:
 
 i [ee] - and
 dlia  - fo
 yakshcho' - if
 bo - because
 tomu' shcho - since, because
 chy - whether
 z - with
 bez - without
 ra'zom - together

Negative forms:
 
 Ni [nee] - No (Literary Ukrainian)
 Nie - No (Western Ukrainian dialect)
 Ne - not
 Nema', nema'ye - there is not, there are not
 niyak' - nohow
 nishcho', nicho'ho - nothing

Exclamations - Vy'huky: 
 
 Os'! - Here you are!
 Hey! - Hey!
 Hayda'! - Let's (go, do etc.)!
 Oy! Oy-yoy! - expresses surprise
 Okh! - exclamations when one is tired
 Harazd'! - Okey! Deal! 

Numerals - Chysliv'nyky:
 
 odyn' - one
 dva - two
 try - three
 choty'ry - four
 pyat' - five
 shist' - six
 sim - seven
 visim - eight
 de'vyat - nine
 de'syat - ten
 odyn'natsyat - eleven
 dvannad'tsyat - tvelve
 trynad'tsyat - thirteen
 dvad'tsyat - tventy
 tryd'tsyat - thirty
 sto - one hundred
 dvis'ti - two hundred
 trys'ta - three hundred
 ty'siacha - one thousand
 million' - one million

Plural forms of nouns are usually formed by endings change into: "-y", "a":
 
 For example:
 
 stil (table) - stoly' (tables)
 selo' (village) - se'la (villages)
 sad (garden) - sady' (gardens)
 sumka, torba (bag) - sumky', tor'by
 trava' (grass) - tra'vy (grasses) 
 voda' (water) - vo'dy (waters)

Plural form of adjectives is formed by endings chaange from "yy" or "iy" into "i":
 
 For example:
 
 rozum'nyy (intellegent) - rozum'ni
 novyy' (new) - novi' 
 dalekyy' (far) - daleki'
 koly'shniy (former) - kolysh'ni
 popered'niy (previous) - popered'ni

MAP OF UKRAINE
MARKING DIALECTS OF UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE

Map of Ukraine with dialects of Ukrainian language

Above: Dialects of Ukrainian language:
1. Volhynian dialect
2. Podillya (Podole) dialect
3. Galician dialect
4 -5. Carpathian dialect (Hutsul and Boyko)
6 -7. Pokuttya (Bokovynian) dialect
8. Kyiv (Kiev) - Poltava dialect
9. Southern dialect

Map of East Slavic Dialects
Names of months in Ukrainian with transliterations



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PAGE CREATED BY ROMAN ZAKHARII
(from Western Ukrainian town Berezhany, in former Austrian province of Galicia, later Poland, USSR and today Ukraine)

Page created on 24th of September, 2001, in Oslo, Norway
(where I worked and studied, doing two years MPhil in Medieval Studies at the University of Oslo).
Updated on 17.07.2013.
I had graduated in history of Ukraine from the University of Lviv in Ukraine and hold MA in Modern Central European history
(specializing in Polish Jewish historiography) from Board of Regents of the University of State of New York (I did it at CEU in Budapest). I would be interested to teach Ukrainian, Russian, Soviet, Polish history / languages or Eastern European Jewish history abroad. Please contact me, if you have any suggestions.
All copyrights reserved. See my CV.

If you have any comments you may write me at roman800@gmail.com
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